Employing Kids This Summer?

 

With the month of May right around the corner, now is a good time to start thinking about hiring youth for summer jobs. Many employers feel discouraged about hiring employees who are under 18 years old because they are worried about violating child labor regulations. Taking a glance at child labor regulations and penalties can leave you with a daunting feeling of, “I’d rather not take the chance”, but summer employment is a great way for minors to learn job skills and minimum wage pays more than a weekly allowance!  The most important thing to do when hiring is minors is to take a close look at both the applicable federal and state child labor regulations to make sure that the minor employee is working in an allowed occupation and within allowed hours. We’ll go over the federal regulations here in detail.

Remember that if your business is a hospital, school, institution for the sick, aged, etc. or a public agency, all of your employees are covered by these rules. If you are not one of those, but your business does at least $500,000 per year in gross sales and you have at least 2 employees, then these rules also apply to all of your employees. If your business does less than $500,000, but you have minors that engage in interstate commerce activities like swiping credit cards that are processed out of state or ordering goods from out of state, then these rules would also apply to those employees on an individual basis.  Informal arrangements with minors to babysit or mow your yard with their family lawn mower are not covered by federal child labor regulations.

Let’s take a look at the federal guidelines found in the Fair Labor Standards Act.  They apply to covered employees under the age of 18.  Once an employee turns 18 they are no longer considered a minor and no federal child labor regulations apply.  Federal regulations do not require any type of child labor permit or certificate but they do require that you keep the date of birth on record.

Generally speaking there are two types of youth employment, agricultural and non-agricultural. The restrictions on non-ag employment are much greater than on ag work.  Within each category the rules change if the minor is employed by a parent.  So let’s take a look at each category.

Non-Agricultural Employment

For Non-Ag employment there are three important age categories.

16-17 years old: No restrictions on time of day or numbers of hours. They may do any job other than those declared hazardous. There are 17 hazardous occupations.  You may check out the list here. Most are obvious, like working at a manufacturing facility that makes explosives, or working with exposure to radioactive substances, or mining. However there are several that routinely get employers in trouble like operating power-driving meat processing equipment (includes meat slicers), operating power-driven dough mixers, operating power-driven trash compactors, operating power-driven types of saws and working on or about a roof.  The most common child labor violation for hazardous occupations is driving. Even if they have a license, 16 year olds may never drive as part of their job.  If they are 17 years old, they may drive under very limited circumstances.

14-15 years old: Restrictions on type of work and hours. They may not work more than 3 hours on a school day, 8 hours on a non-school day, 18 hours per school week, and 40 hours per non-school week.  They may not work before 7am or after 7pm, except from June 1st – Labor Day when they may work until 9pm. There is a list of 16 permissible occupations for 14-15 years old. If it’s not on the list, it’s prohibited. The list can be found here.

Under 14 years old: Employment not allowed.

Exceptions: These rules do not apply to children employed as actors or performers, children engaged in newspaper deliveries, or children who make wreaths in their home.

Employed by a Parent in Non-Ag Work: If you are employing your child in non-ag work, most child labor restrictions do not apply. Basically, they may do anything other than the hazardous occupations.  Also, children under 16 employed by parents may not work in any type mining or manufacturing.  Watch out for driving. Even if your child has a license, driving is considered a hazardous occupation for anyone under 17, and is very restricted for 17 year olds. Also, be aware that in order for the “employed by a parent” to apply, the business has to be 100% owned by the parent.

Agricultural Employment:

16-17 years old: No restrictions on type of work, time of day, or number of hours.

14-15 years old: May work any number of hours outside of school hours in any occupation except those deemed hazardous.  See the list of hazardous ag jobs here.

12-13 years old: May be employed outside of school hours with written parental consent or on a farm where the parent is also employed.  Only non-hazardous occupations.

Under 12 years old: May be employed outside of school hours with parental consent on a farm where the employees are exempt from federal minimum wage provisions.  Only non-hazardous occupations.

Employed by a Parent in Ag Work: If you are employing your child in agricultural work they may do any type of occupation at any time. There are no restrictions.

Please check out your state’s regulations on child labor. A few states have more restrictive rules, but most are either the same or more lenient than the federal regulations. Here is a list of State Department of Labor websites.  If you are employing a minor in the State of Colorado you should check out this fact sheet.

We hope you found this week’s tip helpful and informative. Please pass it along to anyone who might be hiring minors for summer employment. Follow us on facebook to get the next Tip of the Week on your newsfeed!

Link: https://laborbrain.com/employing-kids-this-summer/

–       By Kalen Fraser

The Labor Brain Inc. is not a law firm and its employees do not practice law or provide legal services.  The information provided on our website,  in email correspondence with representatives of The Labor Brain, and at outreach events is for informational and educational purposes only.  The information provided is not a substitute for the advice of an attorney. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coming Soon!

Motor Carrier Overtime Exemption

 

If you employ truck drivers you’ve probably heard of something called the “motor carrier exemption”.  If you don’t know exactly what that means though, you’ve come to the right place.  Here’s what you need to know.

The federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) requires that most employees be paid overtime after 40 hours in a 7 day workweek.  The motor carrier exemption is an exemption from that requirement.

In order to not pay overtime the following conditions must be met.

  • The employer must be a motor carrier or motor private carrier as defined in 49 U.S.C. Section 13102. 
  • The employee must be a driver, driver’s helper, loader, or mechanic, whose works affects the safety of a motor vehicle (that has a Gross Vehicle Weight Rating of at least 10,001 pounds) that is used in transportation in interstate* or foreign commerce.  The employee must be crossing state/international lines, or continuing to transport goods intrastate that have been on an interstate journey and have not come to rest. In the case of loaders and mechanics the employee must be loading up or working on trucks that are going to be making interstate trips. 
  • The employee must not work as a driver, driver’s helper, loader, or mechanic on any vehicles that have a Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR) of less than 10,001 pounds. In any week when an employee works on both types of vehicles (GVWR greater than 10,001 and less than 10,0001)  the employee must be paid overtime.  If an employer has both types of vehicles and wants to claim the exemption for certain employees it is recommended that they keep very precise records of the type of work done by each employee.  There are a few types of vehicles that weigh less than 10,001 pounds that do not affect the exemption.  These include 8 passenger vehicles driven for compensation, 15 passenger vehicles not for compensation, and anything used in transporting hazardous materials with DOT requirements.

*Courts have held that even if an individual driver has not taken an interstate trip the exemption will apply as long as the driver was part of a pool of drivers that could’ve been called upon to make such a trip in the previous four months.

Keep in mind that the exemption is from overtime only.  Accurate time records of hours worked each day and each week must be kept in order to satisfy the minimum wage and record keeping requirements of the FLSA.

If you are a motor carrier employer it would also be smart to check out the Labor Brain’s tip on employment relationship and the difference between employees and independent contractors.  Misclassification of truck drivers as independent contractors (1099s) is a hot topic across the country and could result in catastrophic losses for your company.

We hope you found this week’s tip helpful and informative. Please pass it along to anyone who employs drivers of large vehicles.  Follow us on facebook to get the next Tip of the Week on your newsfeed!

Link: https://laborbrain.com/motor-carrier-overtime-exemption/

–      By Kalen Fraser

The Labor Brain Inc. is not a law firm and its employees do not practice law or provide legal services.  The information provided on our website,  in email correspondence with representatives of The Labor Brain, and at outreach events is for informational and educational purposes only.  The information provided is not a substitute for the advice of an attorney. 

 

 

 

 

Child Day Care Compliance

 

Child day care companies on the Front Range of Colorado have been the target of recent audits by the U.S. Department of Labor: Wage and Hour Division (WHD).   In 2012 and 2013 the WHD in Colorado investigated more child day care companies than any other type of business.  This trend is continuing in 2014 and day care companies should be prepared for an audit of their employment practices under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).

The WHD has been targeting day care employers based on the premise that they are not compensating employees for time spent in training.  Many child day care companies mistakenly think that they do not have to pay for certain training time required by State of Colorado child care licensing requirements but the WHD has taken the position that the time must be paid and included in all hours worked for the week.

All day care companies in Colorado have to abide by the State of Colorado Minimum Wage Order and the federal regulations found in the FLSA.

The FLSA states that time spent in training must be paid for unless it is voluntary, outside of regular working hours, not directly related to the employee’s job, and does not include any productive work.  Many day care companies think that the training time required by the State of Colorado is not compensable since it’s recorded on an individual basis. They misconstrue the state regulations as requiring it of the individual employee when in fact it’s required of the day care center.  The State of Colorado’s “Rules Regulating Child Care Centers”, which are essentially licensing requirements for a day care center, specifically state in 7.702.43(E):

“The center must have a staff development plan that includes a minimum of fifteen (15) clock hours of training each year for all staff. The training must relate to one or more of the following areas-child growth and development, healthy and safe environment, developmentally appropriate practices, guidance, family relationships, cultural and individual diversity, and professionalism.”

The training time is a requirement of the day care center, not the individual employee.  If the day care center follows these regulations and requires its employees to take 15 hours of training per year then the training is not voluntary and it is directly related to the employee’s job.  Therefore, the training time must be paid. The hours of training must be included in the employee’s total hours worked each week when the center is determining whether or not the employee worked overtime.  If this time hasn’t been paid, the WHD will assess back wages and liquidated damages whenever the unpaid time took an employee below minimum wage per hour or cut into their overtime pay.

Other common violations found at child day care centers include:

Unpaid breaks: State of Colorado regulations state that employees are entitled to a 10 minute break for every four hours of work. Federal law states that all breaks of 20 minutes or less must be paid.

Short Lunches: State of Colorado regulations state that employees are entitled to a 30 minute meal break for every five hours of work.  If the lunch break is not a full 30 minutes and free from all work duty then the time must be paid.

Pre-shift/Post-shift time: If day care employees arrive early or stay late, that time must be included in their total hours.  It is common for day care employees to work prior to clocking in for the day or work after clocking out for the day.

Background checks and fingerprinting: Many day care companies require employees to pay for the required background check and fingerprinting.  If the employee pays for this out of pocket, or the employer deducts it from their paycheck, it must not result in the employee being paid less than minimum wage per hour in their first week of work.

Uniforms: State of Colorado regulations do not allow deductions to be made for uniforms.

Misclassifying Preschool Teachers: The FLSA includes an exemption from overtime and minimum wage for teachers. If day care companies are claiming the exemption for any of their preschool teachers they should be prepared to prove that those teachers are spending the majority of their time teaching and instructing children. Examples of this would be a curriculum, lesson plans, etc. If the preschool teacher’s primary duty is caring for the physical needs of the children then the exemption will not be allowed.

We hope you found this week’s tip helpful and informative. Please pass it along to anyone in the day care business.  Follow us on facebook to get the next Tip of the Week on your newsfeed!

Link: https://laborbrain.com/child-day-care-compliance/

–       By Kalen Fraser

The Labor Brain Inc. is not a law firm and its employees do not practice law or provide legal services.  The information provided on our website,  in email correspondence with representatives of The Labor Brain, and at outreach events is for informational and educational purposes only.  The information provided is not a substitute for the advice of an attorney. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Is Training Time Work Time?

 

Employers are often confused about training time and whether or not it must be paid. Training can take many forms including new employee orientation, a weekly staff meeting, a yearly Las Vegas conference, a training webinar, a college course, etc.

As a general rule training time must be paid. However, if it meets all of the following four criteria, then the time would not be considered work time under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) and does not need to be paid.

1. Attendance at training is outside of employee’s regular work hours

AND

2. Attendance is voluntary

AND

3. The training is not directly related to the employee’s job

AND

4. The employee does not perform any productive work during the training

The trickiest of the four factors is usually #2 (attendance is voluntary). Imagine the following scenario:

A company sends out a memo that lists the employees who are scheduled to attend the monthly company training on November 26th with a note that says “if you can’t attend on the 26th, you may attend a substitute training on the 29th” and lists the subject matter that will be discussed including: company policy on safety equipment, how to work new GPS systems, paperwork requirements for new BlueBird project, etc.  In small letters at the bottom of the memo it says “Attendance is voluntary”.

Do you think attendance at that meeting is truly voluntary? No, probably not.

An example of a training that would not be considered work time is the following:

A company offers “Marketing 101” to its 600 lower level employees from 6pm to 8pm every other Wednesday. The curriculum for the classes corresponds closely to a Marketing class offered at the local community college. Any of the lower level employees may attend.  They learn general marketing skills (not just applicable to this company). They don’t do any productive work (i.e. strategic plans for the company, marketing calls, etc.) Employees who don’t attend are not punished (i.e. not eligible for a certain bonus).  The employees who go to the Marketing 101 classes could include it as general training/knowledge on a resume.

The four criteria determine whether or not training time must be paid under federal law found in the FLSA.  If you think you have training that you don’t have to pay for make sure it meets these four criteria as well as any requirements found in your state labor regulations.

If you’re wondering about travel time to trainings check back soon for another tip related to work time: “Is Travel Time Work Time?”

We hope you found this week’s tip helpful and informative. Please pass it along to anyone you think might be at risk as a result not paying for training time. Follow us on facebook to get a weekly tip update on your news feed!

Link: https://laborbrain.com/tip-of-the-week-is-training-time-work-time/

–       By Kalen Fraser

The Labor Brain Inc. is not a law firm and its employees do not practice law or provide legal services.  The information provided on our website,  in email correspondence with representatives of The Labor Brain, and at outreach events is for informational and educational purposes only.  The information provided is not a substitute for the advice of an attorney. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salespeople and Overtime

 

“But I don’t have to pay overtime to my salespeople, right?” is a common question asked at Labor Brain presentations. Many employers assume that their salespeople are exempt from overtime. This assumption comes from the fact that the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) contains two overtime exemptions for sales employees. However, not all sales employees are included under those two exemptions and large overtime liability can result from a misclassification of some or all of your sales staff. In order to determine whether or not your sales people are exempt from overtime let’s take a closer look at the two principal sales exemptions: “7(i)” and “outside sales”.

The first exemption from overtime is referred to as “7(i)” or the “commission exemption”. For this exemption to apply, the employee must meet all three of these criteria:

1)      Be employed by a retail or service establishment as defined in the regulations

2)      Make at least 1.5 times minimum wage

3)      Make more than 50% of their pay in commissions

The definition of “retail or service establishment” in the FLSA is one that sells product or services to the final consumer, business to individual, as opposed to business to business, and whose annual dollar volume of sales is at least 75% non-resale. Common industries that take this exemption are hair dressers, retail clothing stores, plumbers and banquet servers.

If the sales employee works at a bona fide “retail or service establishment” he/she must make at least time and one half minimum wage on an hourly basis. This does not mean that the employee must be paid an hourly wage. It means that each week, if their total pay is divided by their total hours, the rate must be greater than 1.5 times minimum wage, which amounts to $10.88 for federal compliance.

In addition, the employee must make more than 50% of their pay from commissions. This is determined by looking at a “representative period” set by the employer that can be as short as one month or as long as 12 months.

The second exemption that applies to sales employees is called the “outside sales exemption”. It applies to employees whose primary job duty is “making sales” and who is primarily engaged AWAY from the employer’s place of business. An employee who makes sales from the main office or a satellite office or a home office is not engaged away from the place of business. There are no federal pay requirements for employees who meet these two criteria of an outside sales exemption.

In addition to these two main categories there are other smaller overtime exemptions in the FLSA that could apply to sales people including car salesmen and others. If your business is also covered by state labor law, you should check to make sure that these exemptions also apply on a state level.

In conclusion, if you employ sales people, do not assume that they are exempt from overtime. You should be able to point to the exemption in the FLSA that applies to your sales employee and explain why he/she meets the criteria for that specific exemption. And don’t forget that if you are employing non-exempt sales staff, all of their non-discretionary bonuses and commissions must be included in their overtime rate!

We hope you found this week’s tip helpful and informative. Please pass it along to anyone who employs salespeople. Follow us on facebook to get the next Tip of the Week on your newsfeed!

Link:https://laborbrain.com/tip-of-the-week-salespeople-and-overtime/

–          By Kalen Fraser

The Labor Brain Inc. is not a law firm and its employees do not practice law or provide legal services.  The information provided on our website,  in email correspondence with representatives of The Labor Brain, and at outreach events is for informational and educational purposes only.  The information provided is not a substitute for the advice of an attorney. 

 

 

Piece Rate Overtime

 

*Updated with video – see below*

Paying employees a piece rate is the easiest way to connect productivity to pay.  Employers pay a set amount of pay per piece that the employee creates, sells, assembles, packs, ships, etc. Nowadays many companies pay a base rate or base salary plus bonuses or commissions but piece rate was the original pay for performance.

The piece rate method of pay has become less common as many of the manufacturing jobs in the U.S. have gone overseas or technology has rendered them obsolete.  However, many employers still use the piece rate method of payment. Even though paying piece rate is legal many employers get into trouble because they think that they don’t have to pay piece rate employees overtime.

It bears repeating that paying someone sole commissions or salary or piece rate DOES NOT exempt them from overtime. Usually an employee’s job duties are the primary factor in determining whether or not the employee is exempt from overtime.

In today’s tip we’ll look at the two legal methods of piece rate overtime payment found in the Fair Labor Standards Act.  These calculations are also acceptable under most state labor laws but employers in some states, like California, should be extra careful with their piece rate pay practices considering recent court decisions. (Gonzalez v. Downtown LA Motors, LP)

The first method is the most widely used and considered the “normal” method of calculating piece rate overtime.

John is paid $5.00 per lawnmower that he assembles. This week he assembled 108 lawnmowers and worked 48 hours.

                $5.00 * 108 lawnmowers = $540 straight time pay

                $540 / 48 hours = $11.25 per hour regular rate of pay

                $11.25 * 0.5 * 8 overtime hours = $45 due in overtime premium

                Total pay = $585.00 

The second method is an alternative method of calculation and requires that an employee agree with his/her employer in advance of the work being performed that his/her overtime will be calculated in this manner.

John is paid $5.00 per lawnmower that he assembles. This week he assembled 108 lawnmowers and worked 48 hours. He assembled 24 lawnmowers during hours 40 – 48.

                $5.00 * 108 lawnmowers = $540 straight time pay

                $5.00 * 24 overtime lawnmowers * 0.5 = $60 due in overtime premium

                Total pay = $600.00

Obviously the amount due under the “alternative” method may be more or less than what is due under the “normal” method depending on how productive the employee is during the overtime hours.  An employer cannot switch an employee back and forth between these methods of overtime calculation in order to pay the one which results in the least amount of overtime due.

We hope you found this week’s tip helpful and informative. Please pass it along to anyone you think might be at risk as a result of not paying overtime to their piece rate employees. Follow us on facebook to get a weekly tip update on your news feed!

Check out our YouTube video on the topic!

Link:https://laborbrain.com/tip-of-the-week-piece-rate-overtime/

–         By Kalen Fraser

The Labor Brain Inc. is not a law firm and its employees do not practice law or provide legal services.  The information provided on our website,  in email correspondence with representatives of The Labor Brain, and at outreach events is for informational and educational purposes only.  The information provided is not a substitute for the advice of an attorney. 

 

 

Overtime Rate for Tipped Employees

 

One of the most common violations found in audits of restaurants is employers paying tipped employees the incorrect overtime rate.

Overtime, per its federal definition, is the payment of an additional one half an employee’s regular rate for all hours over 40 in a workweek. Some states have laws that also require overtime after a certain number of hours per day.

For employees who are paid a cash wage of less than minimum wage their “regular rate” of pay for overtime purposes is NOT their cash wage, it’s the minimum wage. Unless of course they receive other compensation that must be included in the regular rate like non-discretionary bonuses, service charges, etc.

Let’s look at an example of an employee in Colorado.

Brian, a server at Pizza House, is paid a cash wage of $4.76 per hour. His employer claims a tip credit of $3.02 per hour to arrive at the required state minimum wage of $7.78 per hour.

Brian works 48 hours this week.

Assuming that Brian does not receive any non-discretionary bonuses, services charges, or other compensation that must be included in the regular rate his paycheck would show the following:

Regular hours

48

$4.76

228.48

paid on check

Overtime hours

8

$3.89

31.12

paid on check

Tips

$250.00

already received in tips

The $3.89 is one half of $7.78 which is Brian’s regular rate of pay.  His regular rate of pay includes the tip credit but it does not include other tips received (anything above $3.02 per hour).

The common problem is that restaurant employers pay the overtime premium at half of the cash wage ($2.38).

Another way to think about this is:

$7.78 * 1.5 = $11.67 – $3.02 (tip credit) = $8.65 (this is the amount to show on paychecks if your system shows overtime pay as time and one half)

$8.65 – $4.76 (cash wage) =  $3.89 (overtime premium)

In order to gauge how costly this mistake can be consider the following:

Pizza House has 30 employees, 20 of which are tipped employees that are paid a cash wage of $4.76. They are in the state of Colorado and are covered by state labor laws which require a minimum wage of $7.78.  The employer has been paying overtime based on the cash wage rather than the regular rate.  The tipped employees work an average of 45 hours per week.

5 overtime hours * 20 employees * 104 weeks *1.51 ($3.89 – $2.38) = $15,704 due in back wages and $15,704 due in liquidated damages = $31,408 total owed.

Keep in mind that the variance in state labor laws will affect these calculations. Check out http://www.dol.gov/whd/state/tipped.htm to see a list of state minimum wages and tip regulations.

For example, there are six states that don’t allow employees to be paid a cash wage less than federal minimum wage and have tips make up the difference.  They are Washington, Oregon, Nevada, Montana, Alaska and California.

Also, many states have minimum wages that are higher than the federal minimum wage of $7.25.  For example:  Colorado ($7.78), Illinois ($8.25), Vermont ($8.60), and several others.

We hope you found this week’s tip helpful and informative. Please pass it along to anyone you think might be at risk as a result of not paying the correct overtime rate to tipped employees. Follow us on facebook to get the next Tip of the Week on your newsfeed!

Check out our YouTube video on this topic!

Link: https://laborbrain.com/tip-of-the-week-overtime-rate-for-tipped-employees/

–      By Kalen Fraser

The Labor Brain Inc. is not a law firm and its employees do not practice law or provide legal services.  The information provided on our website,  in email correspondence with representatives of The Labor Brain, and at outreach events is for informational and educational purposes only.  The information provided is not a substitute for the advice of an attorney. 

 

Just Say No To Comp Time

 

Some definitions to get us started:

Compensatory time (“comp time”) aka banked hours: A method used by employers to compensate employees for overtime hours worked. Rather than pay out the overtime owed the employer allows employees to take time off in future weeks or months at either at an amount equal to the overtime hours worked or at time and one half.

Non-exempt employees: Employees to which overtime regulations apply. They are not exempt from the overtime requirements.

This Tip of the Week is very simple. Private sector employers who are covered by the Fair Labor Standards Act (almost everyone) CANNOT under any circumstances use compensatory time or banked hours as a method of compensating non-exempt employees for their overtime.  It does not matter if the employee prefers comp time to actual overtime pay. It is not a legal method of overtime compensation.

Again, this pertains to non-exempt employees; those workers to whom overtime regulations apply.  If you have an employee who is a salaried general manager who meets the requirements of the executive exemption under the regulations found at 29 CFR 541.100 (or any other bona fide exemption) then you are free to give that person compensation (in addition to their guaranteed salary) as you see fit.

The only employees who are eligible to receive comp time are those employed by a state or local agency.  Under the Fair Labor Standards Act (federal law) those employees can receive comp time as long as the following is true:

  • They receive the comp time at time and one half.  So if they worked 5 overtime hours they receive 7.5 hours of comp time.
  • Law enforcement, fire protection, and emergency response personnel and employees engaged in seasonal activities may accrue up to 480 hours of comp time; all other state and local government employees may accrue up to 240 hours.
  • They are allowed to use their comp time for the dates they request it as long as it doesn’t “unduly disrupt” the operations of the agency.
  • There is an agreement place between the employee and the agency or between the representing union and the agency that comp time will be used.

It should be noted that if a state has its own labor laws that cover public agency employees and it bars them from receiving comp time then that law would override the FLSA provisions since the law that most protects the employee is the one that is enforced.

As an interesting side note the U.S. House of Representatives passed a bill, H.R. 1406 Working Families Flexibility Act of 2013, on May 8, 2013. The bill proposes amending the Fair Labor Standards Act to allow private sector employers to use comp time. The bill went to the Senate where it was referred to the Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions. Republicans say it provides flexibility to working parents and that workers prefer time off to pay.  Democrats say that it undermines the 40 hour workweek,  it could result in employers firing workers who won’t work extra long workweeks, and it allows employers to determine when employees take the comp time.  Similar bills were introduced in 1996, 1997, and 2003 to no avail.

We hope you found this week’s tip helpful and informative. Please pass it along to anyone you think might be at risk as a result of using comp time in lieu of overtime pay. Follow us on facebook to get the next Tip of the Week on your newsfeed!

Link: https://laborbrain.com/comptime/

–     By Kalen Fraser

The Labor Brain Inc. is not a law firm and its employees do not practice law or provide legal services.  The information provided on our website,  in email correspondence with representatives of The Labor Brain, and at outreach events is for informational and educational purposes only.  The information provided is not a substitute for the advice of an attorney.