Watch Out For Liquidated Damages in 2014!

 

“What? I have to pay double?”

Welcome to the world of liquidated damages. Until recently, if your business was found in violation of minimum wage or overtime regulations by the US Department of Labor: Wage and Hour Division during an audit you were usually required to pay back wages to your employees for violations found in the last two years. Now, you pay that amount – twice.

Let’s use an actual example to see the impact that liquidated damages can have on an employer’s bottom line.

Company ABC didn’t pay overtime to its salespeople for the last two years because it thought they were exempt. However the salespeople only made sales from inside company headquarters over the phone and internet and did not qualify for the 7(i) exemption because more than 50% of their pay was in base salary. The 40 salespeople at the company averaged 50 hours of work per week over the two year period and were paid an average of $600 per week in base salary and commissions. Company ABC has never been investigated by the Wage and Hour Division before, they had no idea that their employees weren’t exempt, and they maintain perfect time, attendance, and pay records.

Back wages owed: $249,600.00

NEW!  Liquidated Damages owed: $249,600.00

Total: $499,200.00

Historically, liquidated damages were only collected when the Wage and Hour Division (WHD) won a court settlement. Then, in 2011, the WHD began a pilot program on the East Coast; assessing liquidated damages along with back wages in routine investigations during the final conference with the employer.   By 2013 this practice had spread across the country to all regions.  Now the WHD wants liquidated damage assessment to become a normal part of most investigations and it stands to reason that 2014 will see a significant increase in the number of businesses affected by this practice.

If your business is violating minimum wage or overtime regulations found in the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) there is little you can do to avoid a liquidated damage assessment.  A violation does not have to be repeat or willful for such assessment.  The only wiggle room is what’s called a “good faith defense.” The Portal to Portal Act of 1947 amended the FLSA by establishing a good faith defense against liquidated damage assessment if the employer can prove that he/she was acting in good faith and that he/she had reasonable grounds for believing that the action was not a violation of the FLSA. An example of a good faith defense would be legal advice from a labor lawyer.  Unfortunately, blissful ignorance is not a good faith defense.

The only way to avoid liquidated damages in the future is to review your employment practices now. The majority of employers have violations and don’t know it.  Get that lurking employment liability out of the way and start 2014 worry free! Contact the Labor Brain today and we’ll get you on the right track.

We hope you found this week’s tip helpful and informative. Please pass it along to anyone you think might be interested in knowing more about liquidated damages. Follow us on facebook to get a weekly tip update on your news feed!

Link: https://laborbrain.com/tip-of-the-week-watch-out-for-liquidated-damages-in-2014/

–       By Kalen Fraser

The Labor Brain Inc. is not a law firm and its employees do not practice law or provide legal services.  The information provided on our website,  in email correspondence with representatives of The Labor Brain, and at outreach events is for informational and educational purposes only.  The information provided is not a substitute for the advice of an attorney. 

Hotel Compliance in Colorado

 

Hotels in ski resorts have been a specific target of the U.S. Department of Labor: Wage and Hour Division in Colorado for the past three years.  On a national level, hotels have a high rate of investigation by the Wage and Hour Division and they are frequently found in violation of overtime law due to a variety of unique pay practices. In fact, according to the US DOL Data Enforcement website, hotels are the third most commonly investigated sector, only behind full service and limited service restaurants. Another reason for increased enforcement is that hotels employ a high percentage of what the WHD refers to as “vulnerable workers”. Federal labor enforcement agencies have been targeting industries that employ these workers because of their relative high risk of exploitation due to low pay and benefits, ignorance of rights under the law, and/or reluctance to exercise those rights.

A hotel is subject to the FLSA if its annual sales volume exceeds $500,000 per year. Even if it does less than $500,000, some of its individual employees may be covered if they engage in interstate commerce activities like swiping credit cards or ordering goods from out of state. The State of Colorado’s labor laws found in the state Wage Order apply to all private sector employers in four main categories including retail and service.

To stay out of trouble, remember these important nuggets of federal and state compliance information:

General Overtime: Overtime must be paid after 40 hours in a 7 day workweek regardless of the length of the pay period. State of Colorado labor law also requires overtime payment after 12 consecutive hours. Employees cannot waive their right to overtime pay. Overtime is an additional one half of an employee’s regular rate of pay calculated as follows: Total Pay / Total hours = regular rate.

Piece Rate Housekeepers: Housekeepers are often paid a piece rate instead of an hourly rate. For example, housekeepers are paid $4.00 per room and are expected to clean at least 2 rooms per hour.  This method of payment is legal but it doesn’t exempt these employees from minimum wage or overtime law.  Employers must pay these employees the additional one half of their regular rate of pay for all hours over 40 in a week. They must also check to make sure that employees have been paid at least the minimum wage for all of their hours. Employers must keep a record of hours worked for piece rate housekeepers just like they do for hourly rate employees.

Pre-shift working time for housekeepers: Housekeepers often gather cleaning supplies and attend morning meets prior to clocking in for the day.  That time is considered work time and must be paid. It’s important to have housekeepers clock in before performing any work related activities. Changing into a uniform upon arrival at work is usually not considered work time.

Automatic deductions for lunches: Be careful about automatically deducting a 30 minute lunch break from non-exempt employees’ time each day.  Hotel employees are often working on a tight schedule and may not be taking a full 30 minute break even though the full 30 minutes is being deducted. This can result in substantial overtime back wages.  Make sure that employees are taking their full 30 minutes or that they are clocking in and out for lunch on a time clock that doesn’t deduct for lunch breaks less than 30 minutes.

Bonuses and Commissions for Front Desk and Sales Employees: A common overtime violation occurs when employers fail to pay overtime on non-discretionary bonuses and commissions. Non-discretionary bonuses include attendance, safety, performance, and sales bonuses. The weekly amount of those bonuses must be included in the regular rate of pay that determines the overtime amount.

Uniform Deductions: Colorado labor law does not allow deductions from employees’ pay for the cost of uniforms.

Contracting with a temporary staffing agency:  Make sure that temp agencies pay their employees that work at your establishment in accordance with federal and state labor laws. The Wage and Hour Division will assert a joint employment relationship between a hotel and its staffing agency making both entities ultimately responsible for labor law compliance.

Misclassifying Employees as Salary Exempt: Hotels have a tendency to liberally apply salary exemptions. A salary exempt employee is someone who meets certain job duty requirements and is paid a weekly salary of at least $455 per week. Employers do not have to pay overtime to these employees. However, paying an employee a salary does not make them salaried exempt.  They must also meet the specific job duty requirements set forth in the federal regulations. For example, hotels often classify office workers as exempt under the Administrative category. To meet this exemption, employees must use independent judgment and discretion with respect to matters of significance. Bookkeepers, office assistants, front desk attendants, certain types of “coordinators”, data entry employees, and many others do not meet this job requirement and should not be classified as exempt from overtime.

It is a good idea to audit your hotel employment practices on a regular basis to make sure that you are complying with all state and federal labor laws. Contact us today to get started!

We hope you found this week’s tip helpful and informative. Please pass it along to any hotel employers or managers. Follow us on facebook to get a weekly tip update on your news feed!

Link: https://laborbrain.com/tip-week-hotel-compliance-colorado/

–       By Kalen Fraser

The Labor Brain Inc. is not a law firm and its employees do not practice law or provide legal services.  The information provided on our website,  in email correspondence with representatives of The Labor Brain, and at outreach events is for informational and educational purposes only.  The information provided is not a substitute for the advice of an attorney. 

Happy Thanksgiving!

 

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Is Training Time Work Time?

 

Employers are often confused about training time and whether or not it must be paid. Training can take many forms including new employee orientation, a weekly staff meeting, a yearly Las Vegas conference, a training webinar, a college course, etc.

As a general rule training time must be paid. However, if it meets all of the following four criteria, then the time would not be considered work time under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) and does not need to be paid.

1. Attendance at training is outside of employee’s regular work hours

AND

2. Attendance is voluntary

AND

3. The training is not directly related to the employee’s job

AND

4. The employee does not perform any productive work during the training

The trickiest of the four factors is usually #2 (attendance is voluntary). Imagine the following scenario:

A company sends out a memo that lists the employees who are scheduled to attend the monthly company training on November 26th with a note that says “if you can’t attend on the 26th, you may attend a substitute training on the 29th” and lists the subject matter that will be discussed including: company policy on safety equipment, how to work new GPS systems, paperwork requirements for new BlueBird project, etc.  In small letters at the bottom of the memo it says “Attendance is voluntary”.

Do you think attendance at that meeting is truly voluntary? No, probably not.

An example of a training that would not be considered work time is the following:

A company offers “Marketing 101” to its 600 lower level employees from 6pm to 8pm every other Wednesday. The curriculum for the classes corresponds closely to a Marketing class offered at the local community college. Any of the lower level employees may attend.  They learn general marketing skills (not just applicable to this company). They don’t do any productive work (i.e. strategic plans for the company, marketing calls, etc.) Employees who don’t attend are not punished (i.e. not eligible for a certain bonus).  The employees who go to the Marketing 101 classes could include it as general training/knowledge on a resume.

The four criteria determine whether or not training time must be paid under federal law found in the FLSA.  If you think you have training that you don’t have to pay for make sure it meets these four criteria as well as any requirements found in your state labor regulations.

If you’re wondering about travel time to trainings check back soon for another tip related to work time: “Is Travel Time Work Time?”

We hope you found this week’s tip helpful and informative. Please pass it along to anyone you think might be at risk as a result not paying for training time. Follow us on facebook to get a weekly tip update on your news feed!

Link: https://laborbrain.com/tip-of-the-week-is-training-time-work-time/

–       By Kalen Fraser

The Labor Brain Inc. is not a law firm and its employees do not practice law or provide legal services.  The information provided on our website,  in email correspondence with representatives of The Labor Brain, and at outreach events is for informational and educational purposes only.  The information provided is not a substitute for the advice of an attorney. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Overtime

 

Overtime is a big deal. According to data available on the U.S. DOL Data Enforcement website, employers in the U.S. have agreed to pay more than $2.2 billion dollars in federal overtime back wages for audits concluded since 2007. That compares to the relatively small amount of $307 million agreed to for federal minimum wage back wages.  The high amount of overtime back wages isn’t only because some employers flat out refuse to pay overtime. Many of the employers found in violation were paying overtime – just not correctly and not in total compliance with the law.

The rules for how and when to pay overtime come from two sources, federal and state. Federal overtime law is found in the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). State of Colorado overtime law is found in the State of Colorado Wage Order. A private business is subject to the FLSA if its annual sales exceed $500,000. Even if it does less than $500,000 per year, some of its individual employees may be covered if they engage in interstate commerce activities like swiping credit cards or ordering goods from out of state.  The State of Colorado Wage Order applies to all private sector employers in four main industry classifications: food and beverage, retail and service, commercial support services, and health and medical.

Many employers with the best of intentions find themselves in trouble with overtime because of the complexity over when to pay it, how to calculate it, and to which employees it applies. Hopefully the following helpful hints will help you stay in compliance with federal and state overtime requirements.

When to pay it: Federal law requires overtime to be paid after 40 hours in a seven day workweek regardless of the length of the pay period. State of Colorado law also requires overtime payment after 12 consecutive hours. Employers who pay on a semi-monthly basis (twice per month) are often in violation of overtime because they aren’t calculating the number of overtime hours worked on a weekly basis.

How to calculate it: Overtime, in both federal and state law, is an additional one half of an employee’s regular rate of pay.  It’s very important to note that the regular rate is not always the same as the hourly rate. If a non-exempt employee receives service charges, non-discretionary bonuses, or commissions, those amounts must be included in the employee’s regular rate calculation, effectively raising the overtime rate of pay.

To whom it applies: All employees who are considered non-exempt and covered by federal and/or state labor law must be paid overtime. There are numerous exemptions from the overtime requirements including employees who work in agriculture, sales, executive positions, professional positions, interstate trucking, and many others. If you think that any of your employees is exempt from overtime, you should be able to point to the corresponding exemption in federal and/or state law and be able to explain how your employee meets the criteria for the specific exemption.  A common misconception among employers is that if they pay employees a salary, a piece rate or a day rate, it makes them exempt from overtime.  Another unlawful practice is giving comp time or banked hours to employees. The only employees eligible to receive comp time instead of overtime pay are public sector employees.

We hope you found this week’s tip helpful and informative. Please pass it along to anyone you think might be at risk as a result of not paying overtime correctly. Follow us on facebook to get the next Tip of the Week on your newsfeed!

Link: https://laborbrain.com/tip-of-the-week-overtime/

–       By Kalen Fraser

The Labor Brain Inc. is not a law firm and its employees do not practice law or provide legal services.  The information provided on our website,  in email correspondence with representatives of The Labor Brain, and at outreach events is for informational and educational purposes only.  The information provided is not a substitute for the advice of an attorney. 

Restaurant Compliance in Colorado

 

*Edited in 2014 to reflect Colorado Minimum Wage increase*

As if running a restaurant wasn’t hard enough. Most restaurants contend with low profit margins, high competition, costly employee turnover, food inspections, and increases in rent. One more thing to add to a restaurant owner’s worry list: U.S. Department of Labor (U.S. DOL) audits.

The Wage and Hour Division (WHD) of the U.S. DOL is responsible for enforcing the Fair Labor Standards Act which regulates minimum wage, overtime, child labor and record keeping. Restaurants are notorious for having violations in all four categories, and the WHD has long considered the restaurant industry at high risk for non-compliance. In fact, according to the US DOL Data Enforcement website, full service restaurants and limited service restaurants are the two categories of business industry most likely to be investigated. Full service restaurants alone have more than 12,000 cases while the next highest non-restaurant industry, hotels and motels, have just 4,500. Another reason for increased enforcement is that restaurants employ a high percentage of what the WHD refers to as “vulnerable workers”. Federal labor enforcement agencies have been targeting industries that employ these workers because of their relative high risk of exploitation due to low pay and benefits, ignorance of rights under the law, and/or reluctance to exercise those rights.

A restaurant is subject to the Fair Labor Standards Act if its annual sales volume exceeds $500,000 per year. Even if it does less than $500,000, some of its individual employees may be covered if they engage in interstate commerce activities like swiping credit cards or ordering goods from out of state. The State of Colorado Wage Order applies to all private sector employers in four main categories including food and beverage.

To stay out of trouble, remember these important nuggets of federal and state compliance information:

Overtime: Must be paid after 40 hours in a 7 day workweek regardless of the length of the pay period. State of Colorado labor law also requires overtime payment after 12 consecutive hours. Employees cannot waive their right to overtime pay.

Tip pools: Tip pools may not include any kitchen staff or management employees.

Notice of tip credit: If you are taking a tip credit (i.e. paying your servers $4.98 and taking a tip credit of $3.02) then you must notify them of certain tip information either verbally or in writing.

Tipped Employee Overtime Rate: In Colorado, if you are paying a server $4.98 per hour and taking a tip credit of $3.02, the additional half-time owed for each overtime hour is half of the applicable minimum wage, which is currently $8.00.  (Assuming that no other service charges or non-discretionary bonuses were paid to the employee)

Service Charges and Non-discretionary Bonuses and Commissions: All of these payments must be included in the regular rate used to determine overtime pay.

Credit Card Processing Fee: Colorado labor law does not allow employers to deduct the credit card processing fee from employees that receive a tip credit.

Uniform Deductions: Colorado labor law does not allow deductions from employees’ pay for the cost of uniforms.

Back of the house employees: Dishwashers, prep cooks, and janitors are not exempt from overtime even if they are paid a salary unless they are in a bona fide management position. Paying these employees a salary does not exempt them from overtime.

In addition to these minimum wage and overtime requirements, be sure to check out the federal and state record keeping requirements and child labor restrictions. Making some small changes to your employment practices today can really help to limit your potential liability in the years ahead.

We hope you found this week’s tip helpful and informative. Please pass it along to any restaurant employers in Colorado. Follow us on facebook to get the next Tip of the Week on your newsfeed!

Link: https://laborbrain.com/tip-of-the-week-restaurant-compliance-in-colorado/

–     By Kalen Fraser

The Labor Brain Inc. is not a law firm and its employees do not practice law or provide legal services.  The information provided on our website,  in email correspondence with representatives of The Labor Brain, and at outreach events is for informational and educational purposes only.  The information provided is not a substitute for the advice of an attorney. 

Salespeople and Overtime

 

“But I don’t have to pay overtime to my salespeople, right?” is a common question asked at Labor Brain presentations. Many employers assume that their salespeople are exempt from overtime. This assumption comes from the fact that the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) contains two overtime exemptions for sales employees. However, not all sales employees are included under those two exemptions and large overtime liability can result from a misclassification of some or all of your sales staff. In order to determine whether or not your sales people are exempt from overtime let’s take a closer look at the two principal sales exemptions: “7(i)” and “outside sales”.

The first exemption from overtime is referred to as “7(i)” or the “commission exemption”. For this exemption to apply, the employee must meet all three of these criteria:

1)      Be employed by a retail or service establishment as defined in the regulations

2)      Make at least 1.5 times minimum wage

3)      Make more than 50% of their pay in commissions

The definition of “retail or service establishment” in the FLSA is one that sells product or services to the final consumer, business to individual, as opposed to business to business, and whose annual dollar volume of sales is at least 75% non-resale. Common industries that take this exemption are hair dressers, retail clothing stores, plumbers and banquet servers.

If the sales employee works at a bona fide “retail or service establishment” he/she must make at least time and one half minimum wage on an hourly basis. This does not mean that the employee must be paid an hourly wage. It means that each week, if their total pay is divided by their total hours, the rate must be greater than 1.5 times minimum wage, which amounts to $10.88 for federal compliance.

In addition, the employee must make more than 50% of their pay from commissions. This is determined by looking at a “representative period” set by the employer that can be as short as one month or as long as 12 months.

The second exemption that applies to sales employees is called the “outside sales exemption”. It applies to employees whose primary job duty is “making sales” and who is primarily engaged AWAY from the employer’s place of business. An employee who makes sales from the main office or a satellite office or a home office is not engaged away from the place of business. There are no federal pay requirements for employees who meet these two criteria of an outside sales exemption.

In addition to these two main categories there are other smaller overtime exemptions in the FLSA that could apply to sales people including car salesmen and others. If your business is also covered by state labor law, you should check to make sure that these exemptions also apply on a state level.

In conclusion, if you employ sales people, do not assume that they are exempt from overtime. You should be able to point to the exemption in the FLSA that applies to your sales employee and explain why he/she meets the criteria for that specific exemption. And don’t forget that if you are employing non-exempt sales staff, all of their non-discretionary bonuses and commissions must be included in their overtime rate!

We hope you found this week’s tip helpful and informative. Please pass it along to anyone who employs salespeople. Follow us on facebook to get the next Tip of the Week on your newsfeed!

Link:https://laborbrain.com/tip-of-the-week-salespeople-and-overtime/

–          By Kalen Fraser

The Labor Brain Inc. is not a law firm and its employees do not practice law or provide legal services.  The information provided on our website,  in email correspondence with representatives of The Labor Brain, and at outreach events is for informational and educational purposes only.  The information provided is not a substitute for the advice of an attorney. 

 

 

What is the FLSA?

 

The Fair Labor Standards Act is the federal labor statute that applies to most companies in the United States. It regulates minimum wage, overtime, child labor, and record keeping.

Whether or not you have to abide by the rules set forth in the FLSA depends on the size of your company and what type of work your employees do.  Although the statue was written in a way that could’ve been interpreted narrowly, courts have expanded the statute’s reach to include most employers and employees in the U.S.

If your business has annual sales and service revenue of at least $500,000 and you employ at least 2 employees then your business must abide by the FLSA. There are many exemptions from portions of the FLSA that might affect some or all of your employees.  For example, if you employ interstate truck drivers they might be exempt from the overtime provisions of the FLSA but all of the other sections (minimum wage, record keeping, and child labor) would still apply.

Also, hospitals, schools, and public agencies are automatically covered by the FLSA regardless of their amount of annual revenue.

If your business has annual revenue of less than $500,000 but individual employees are “engaged in interstate commerce” by doing things like ordering supplies from another state, swiping a credit card that is processed in another state, cleaning a bank that engages in interstate transactions, manufacturing an item to be sold in another state, etc. then the laws of the FLSA will apply to that individual employee even if they don’t apply to everyone at the company.

Remember that even if your business or certain employees at your business are not covered by the FLSA there might be state specific labor laws that apply to your business.  If you are covered by both the FLSA and state labor laws you must comply with the law that most protects (benefits) the employee in every instance.  This Handy Reference Guide summarizes the FLSA and all of its provisions in easy to understand language.

We hope you found this week’s tip helpful and informative. Please pass it along to anyone who doesn’t know what the FLSA is or if it applies to their company. Follow us on facebook to get the next Tip of the Week on your newsfeed!

Link: https://laborbrain.com/tip-of-the-week-what-is-the-flsa/

–         By Kalen Fraser

The Labor Brain Inc. is not a law firm and its employees do not practice law or provide legal services.  The information provided on our website,  in email correspondence with representatives of The Labor Brain, and at outreach events is for informational and educational purposes only.  The information provided is not a substitute for the advice of an attorney. 

 

 

 

 

Required Posters

 

Never fear employers! Contrary to the notices you get in the mail from the poster salesmen the government isn’t going to fine you $100,000 for not hanging up an employment poster.

Usually, all of the posters that are required by law can be found online for free at the agency’s website. For example, federal employment posters can be found here and State of Colorado employment posters can be found here. You only have to post the posters that apply to your business so if you don’t have migrant and seasonal workers, you don’t have to post the migrant seasonal worker protection act poster. Got it?

Even though the individual posters are free it’s probably easier (and takes up less space) to buy the all-in-one poster deals. Just make sure that it includes all of the specialty posters that you might be required to post based on your type of business.  And remember that the government wants you to post the posters in a place where workers can SEE it and READ it. So it can’t go behind the door that’s always open. Maybe the inside of the bathroom stall?

We hope you found this week’s tip helpful and informative. Please pass it along to anyone you think might be at risk as a result of not posting the correct employment posters. Follow us on facebook to get the next Tip of the Week on your newsfeed!

Link: https://laborbrain.com/tip-of-the-week-required-posters/

–      By Kalen Fraser

The Labor Brain Inc. is not a law firm and its employees do not practice law or provide legal services.  The information provided on our website,  in email correspondence with representatives of The Labor Brain, and at outreach events is for informational and educational purposes only.  The information provided is not a substitute for the advice of an attorney. 

Piece Rate Overtime

 

*Updated with video – see below*

Paying employees a piece rate is the easiest way to connect productivity to pay.  Employers pay a set amount of pay per piece that the employee creates, sells, assembles, packs, ships, etc. Nowadays many companies pay a base rate or base salary plus bonuses or commissions but piece rate was the original pay for performance.

The piece rate method of pay has become less common as many of the manufacturing jobs in the U.S. have gone overseas or technology has rendered them obsolete.  However, many employers still use the piece rate method of payment. Even though paying piece rate is legal many employers get into trouble because they think that they don’t have to pay piece rate employees overtime.

It bears repeating that paying someone sole commissions or salary or piece rate DOES NOT exempt them from overtime. Usually an employee’s job duties are the primary factor in determining whether or not the employee is exempt from overtime.

In today’s tip we’ll look at the two legal methods of piece rate overtime payment found in the Fair Labor Standards Act.  These calculations are also acceptable under most state labor laws but employers in some states, like California, should be extra careful with their piece rate pay practices considering recent court decisions. (Gonzalez v. Downtown LA Motors, LP)

The first method is the most widely used and considered the “normal” method of calculating piece rate overtime.

John is paid $5.00 per lawnmower that he assembles. This week he assembled 108 lawnmowers and worked 48 hours.

                $5.00 * 108 lawnmowers = $540 straight time pay

                $540 / 48 hours = $11.25 per hour regular rate of pay

                $11.25 * 0.5 * 8 overtime hours = $45 due in overtime premium

                Total pay = $585.00 

The second method is an alternative method of calculation and requires that an employee agree with his/her employer in advance of the work being performed that his/her overtime will be calculated in this manner.

John is paid $5.00 per lawnmower that he assembles. This week he assembled 108 lawnmowers and worked 48 hours. He assembled 24 lawnmowers during hours 40 – 48.

                $5.00 * 108 lawnmowers = $540 straight time pay

                $5.00 * 24 overtime lawnmowers * 0.5 = $60 due in overtime premium

                Total pay = $600.00

Obviously the amount due under the “alternative” method may be more or less than what is due under the “normal” method depending on how productive the employee is during the overtime hours.  An employer cannot switch an employee back and forth between these methods of overtime calculation in order to pay the one which results in the least amount of overtime due.

We hope you found this week’s tip helpful and informative. Please pass it along to anyone you think might be at risk as a result of not paying overtime to their piece rate employees. Follow us on facebook to get a weekly tip update on your news feed!

Check out our YouTube video on the topic!

Link:https://laborbrain.com/tip-of-the-week-piece-rate-overtime/

–         By Kalen Fraser

The Labor Brain Inc. is not a law firm and its employees do not practice law or provide legal services.  The information provided on our website,  in email correspondence with representatives of The Labor Brain, and at outreach events is for informational and educational purposes only.  The information provided is not a substitute for the advice of an attorney.